Victorian Kitchens

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Many homes today are situated with an open floor plan. One of the main draws to this layout is the ability to see and interact with friends and family as you prepare meals in the kitchen. While we see the benefits of an open kitchen, the Victorians kept their kitchens hidden from visitors’ sights.

Kitchens in the Victorian era were located either in the back of the house or in the basement, generally consisting of a large workroom with a pantry. Some homes also connected the kitchen to the servant quarters, allowing easy access to firing the stoves or starting on the morning’s first cup of coffee. Cast iron stoves emerged as the most convenient way to prepare food. These stoves allowed cooks to adjust flues and metal plates, which in turn aided in the control of temperature. And what about that first cup of coffee? With Starbucks and Keurigs everywhere today, it doesn’t seem too hard to get that quick wake-me-up. However, the Victorians physically ground their own cup of coffee using the aptly named coffee grinders.

IMG_20170730_183654_971This guy here can grind one whole cup of coffee!

Throughout the era, new kitchen gadgets mass produced paved a way for new modes of cooking. Created to reduce both time and labor, these innovative gadgets included pastry cutters, cheese graters, potato peelers, and can openers – all of which are still common in our kitchens today. While home refrigerators didn’t surface until 1913, various preservation techniques were used in the kitchens. Victorians salted, pickled, smoked, and canned many of their meats and vegetables. These would then be stored in either the pantry or the root cellar. *Fun Fact*: Robert Tinker made sure his Cottage had both a pantry and root cellar!

20170726_152944Part of the Tinkers’ larger pantry. Stop by to see the rest of the neat items the Victorians used! ©TinkerSwissCottageMuseum&Gardens

During the latter half of the Victorian era both indoor plumbing and electricity allowed for even more kitchen innovations. Full sinks were installed, along with early electric stoves. Although refrigerators didn’t come into homes until the early years of the twentieth century, ice boxes cropped up in kitchens throughout the Victorian era. The Tinkers’ stove was removed from the property a number of years ago, but when you come to visit you’ll still see their original sink, pantry, and a large number of items the Tinkers and their servants used on a daily basis. We look forward to seeing you soon!

20170726_153008*Cherry pie not guaranteed 😉

 

¤Samantha

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