Lighting the Cottage

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Although it may not seem like it, electricity is a fairly new technology. For centuries, candles, fireplaces, and oil lamps were the only means of illuminating both businesses and homes. We know that Robert Tinker spent the early years in his Swiss-styled Cottage in the same way. Yet, as you travel through the Cottage today, you will notice that electricity flows throughout the home. Join us as we take a stroll through the history of illuminating the Cottage!

When Robert began construction on the Cottage, fireplaces, candles, and oil lamps were all that people had to light their homes. In the first phase of construction, Robert did not include a fireplace. However, during the second phase of construction Robert installed two fireplaces: one in the parlor and one in the library. The Tinkers used candles, candelabras, and oil lamps to light the other rooms of their home.

However, the Tinkers were also fortunate enough that gas lighting was installed in their Cottage. There are numerous gas light fixtures mounted on the walls throughout the rooms of the first floor. One can confirm these sconces are gas powered due to the fact that they have knobs which were used to turn the gas on and off. Gas came into the home through underground pipes, similar to how it is done nowadays. Often times, the gas was manufactured locally through coal. Gas distributors would heat coal in a sealed oven, purify, filter, and pressurize it before it was eventually sent out to homes and businesses. Gas fixtures generally faced upwards and had a glass shade due to the fact that they produced a flame. Often times these shades displayed embellishments of some kind, whether frosted glass, colored, or patterns etched in.

In the sitting room of the Cottage you will find two different chandeliers. The first one hangs low into the room. Gas light fixtures were commonly installed at a safe distance below the ceiling for two reasons: to ensure the user could turn it on and off and as a safeguard to keep the ceiling from catching fire!

© Rockford Park District  -  Photo by Jesse Fox                                     ©TinkerSwissCottageMuseum&Gardens

The other chandelier found in the sitting room is a combination of gas and electricity. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, electrical lighting devices began appearing in the homes of wealthy individuals. On Friday, August 4, 1882, Robert Tinker wrote in his journal, “Started electric light of house.” The Tinkers enjoyed the new technological innovations appearing throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and electricity was one of them. The Cottage hosts not one, but two gas-electric combination chandeliers! Although electricity was eventually wired throughout all levels of the home, many of the original oil lamps, candle holders, and gas fixtures still have a place in the Cottage. We look forward to your next visit!

 

~Samantha

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